HISTORY

The Estate has been a landmark for the region throughout time. The recent history of the Estate is well documented, and its earlier history has been established through archaeological findings.

Some of them are displayed in the Archaeological Museum of Karystos and more still lie on the estate.

The buildings on the estate were built during different periods. Traces of this long history are still evident in both their architecture and decoration. One part of the wine cellar, for instance, is housed in what was once the church of Saint Marcus, while the other was previously a stable constructed during the Ottoman occupation. A grand succession of marble stairs – the remains of an ancient road – runs through the terraces of the vineyard.

During the Ottoman occupation, the estate became a favoured retreat of Ömer Bey of Karystos – later Pasha of Evia – and was thereafter known as ‘The Pasha’s Gardens.’

After the liberation in 1833, the estate was purchased by Ioannis Paparrigopoulos, Vice-Consul of Russia and later Chamberlain at the court of King George I and adviser to the Greek State.

In 1877 Ioannis Konstantinidis, a wealthy merchant from Alexandria, Egypt, acquired the estate. The cosmopolitan new owner preserved it in perfect condition and strengthened its productive exploitation, particularly lemons.

In the 20th century -in the 50’s – the property was abandoned and fell into ruin. The sensational buildings and terraces became “beautiful ruins”.
In 1986, the estate was acquired by the family of Pavlos Karakostas. The estate was then named “Montofoli” after the hill on which it lies. The goal of the new owners was to awaken the “Sleeping Beauty’’: restore the historic buildings and cultivate its land by planting a vineyard.

montofoli-history-museum

HISTORY

The Estate has been a landmark for the region throughout time. The recent history of the Estate is well documented, and its earlier history has been established through archaeological findings.

history

Some of them are displayed in the Archaeological Museum of Karystos and more still lie on the estate.

The buildings on the estate were built during different periods. Traces of this long history are still evident in both their architecture and decoration. One part of the wine cellar, for instance, is housed in what was once the church of Saint Marcus, while the other was previously a stable constructed during the Ottoman occupation. A grand succession of marble stairs – the remains of an ancient road – runs through the terraces of the vineyard.

During the Ottoman occupation, the estate became a favoured retreat of Ömer Bey of Karystos – later Pasha of Evia – and was thereafter known as ‘The Pasha’s Gardens.’

After the liberation in 1833, the estate was purchased by Ioannis Paparrigopoulos, Vice-Consul of Russia and later Chamberlain at the court of King George I and adviser to the Greek State.

In 1877 Ioannis Konstantinidis, a wealthy merchant from Alexandria, Egypt, acquired the estate. The cosmopolitan new owner preserved it in perfect condition and strengthened its productive exploitation, particularly lemons.

In the 20th century -in the 50’s – the property was abandoned and fell into ruin. The sensational buildings and terraces became “beautiful ruins”.
In 1986, the estate was acquired by the family of Pavlos Karakostas. The estate was then named “Montofoli” after the hill on which it lies. The goal of the new owners was to awaken the “Sleeping Beauty’’: restore the historic buildings and cultivate its land by planting a vineyard.

Some of them are displayed in the Archaeological Museum of Karystos and more still lie on the estate.

The buildings on the estate were built during different periods. Traces of this long history are still evident in both their architecture and decoration. One part of the wine cellar, for instance, is housed in what was once the church of Saint Marcus, while the other was previously a stable constructed during the Ottoman occupation. A grand succession of marble stairs – the remains of an ancient road – runs through the terraces of the vineyard.

During the Ottoman occupation, the estate became a favoured retreat of Ömer Bey of Karystos – later Pasha of Evia – and was thereafter known as ‘The Pasha’s Gardens.’

After the liberation in 1833, the estate was purchased by Ioannis Paparrigopoulos, Vice-Consul of Russia and later Chamberlain at the court of King George I and adviser to the Greek State.

In 1877 Ioannis Konstantinidis, a wealthy merchant from Alexandria, Egypt, acquired the estate. The cosmopolitan new owner preserved it in perfect condition and strengthened its productive exploitation, particularly lemons.

In the 20th century -in the 50’s – the property was abandoned and fell into ruin. The sensational buildings and terraces became “beautiful ruins”.
In 1986, the estate was acquired by the family of Pavlos Karakostas. The estate was then named “Montofoli” after the hill on which it lies. The goal of the new owners was to awaken the “Sleeping Beauty’’: restore the historic buildings and cultivate its land by planting a vineyard.

history